Monday, August 11, 2008

Manic Monday: Boil

I wonder... what is the time difference of boiling something at sea level (needs to reach 212.15 °F) to boiling something at my elevation (needs to reach 202.89 °F). I know it would be a shorter time, but I hardly think that leaves me at an advantage. Reading up on a water-bath canner I notice that for my elevation I have to increase the processing time an extra ten minutes. That hardly seems compensatory. I don't think it takes ten minutes longer to go an extra ten degrees in temperature....

I guess life isn't fair sometimes, is it?

12 comments:

Rachel Chick said...

Clancy, you are so GREAT!! LOL! You make me laugh so much!

Kaci said...

LOL! :)

Maria Hart said...

At higher altitudes, air pressure is lower (there are fewer air particles pushing on the water, keeping it from boiling). The reduced air pressure lowers the temperature at which water boils in an open container. So, water boils faster at higher altitudes but it takes longer to cook foods because the water boils at a lower temperature. This lower temperature slows down the physical and chemical changes that take place when foods are cooked in water. Savvy?!

Carmy said...

uhhhhhhhhh.........
i think maria has it down...
because i have no idea...lol
maybe we all just need to move somewhere with higher elevation? or...lower?
ow my head.., i haven't had to think that hard in a long time...
tee hee
love ya tons clank! ^_^

Ginny said...

That was a good one. I love your new layout (if you changed it a while ago I plead for clemency considering my recent departures). No wonder my pasta always takes a bit longer to get to al dente!!!

Tink *~*~* said...

All that elevation stuff has always been a mystery to me. It's like a degree loses or gains something as you go up and down... freaky!

a big, fat "I dunno" from -
Tink *~*~*
My Mobile Adventures *~*~*

Travis said...

Uhm...I suck at math and science, so I'll ditto what Maria said.

Clancy in Idaho said...

Funny. I guess I didn't word this post very well. I actually know the science of this. I was feeling pretty lucky because water boils faster at my altitude... but then I realized that it's not really to my advantage because things take longer to cook here. I just wondered if the difference in boiling time at sea level and my altitude was compensatory to the difference in the cooking time. Is it the same??? Does it take ten minutes longer to boil water at sea level than it does here?

Maria Hart said...

It depends on how hot your stove top gets. When I lived in CT, the estate we lived on had an AGA stove (British and very$$$) that could boil water at sea level in 2 minutes flat. That is very fast, even for Idaho Falls.

Clancy in Idaho said...

That makes sense... I'm sure that there would need to be a big experiment with control groups and all that. They would need to measure the barometric pressure every time and factor in variables of the stove and lots of other things... interesting.

Leah said...

I've always lived at sea level so I've never had to put a single bit of thought into it. LOL

Kristin said...

I guess you're right... I haven't been commenting much. I didn't have anything to write on BOIL. And I really couldn't think of a comment worth mentioning. :) I'll try to do better... for you. ;)